Reworking Assignment 2

Its useful to hear someone else talk about the painting which has helped me reevaluate against the idea of fitting into a new culture.

The strong shadow suggests being unsettled which I was when I first arrived.   The cultures are very different and this unsettled feeling is in response to the overwhelming differences to consider.   There were differences in the environment as well as with people.   I found the asian culture differences intense in each of the senses where when simply walking down the street you face strong smells and a overwhelming variety of signs and noises.   Being unsettled also pushes you to try fitting in more to get more settled, this suggests I need to add marks to balance out the strong shadows.  What would provide balance or a move towards balance and reduce the unsettled feeling?

Fork has a solid linear quality and allows the aluminium support to shine through and uses negative space well.    The spoon is again a solid smooth quality which is more realistic despite my intention to reduce it down to some minimal marks and work more with negative space.  Theres an intimate connection between fork and spoon reflecting the connection with the western culture more than the asian.

Chopstick is hammer like, painted in a more straight forward manor reflecting a basic connection and less expressive.

I like the idea of sensing the culture in different ways and reminds me of the blind portrait sketching I did in assignment 3.   Would drawing and painting the chopstick, spoon and fork blind reflect an experience of sensing something new like the culture by translating the touch visually?

 

The chopstick felt light and smooth at one end moving to sharp pointy at the other.  The chopstick rest felt mostly spiky and sharp with smooth bits in-between.   The fork and spoon felt heavy, solid, curved and smooth.    I liked the idea of moving oil paint around on the surface to create the rests spiky feeling or smooth curved parts to reflect more what I felt.

The environment is mostly colder inside than outside with extreme difference adding to the unsettled feeling.    This could translate into a mix of warmer blurred areas and cold sharp areas.   I could use the transparent gesso to create the blurred areas and leave the sharp cold areas or add some smooth flat areas.

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I applied oil with liquin for the rest and moved it around with a knife and stick to create sharp points and lines.   For the spoon I used oil and liquin again but used a brush to apply and attempted to push the paint down and outwards as I moved down the handle.

I applied transparent guesso on parts of the background and enamels to create smooth shiny flat areas.   The result was more unbalanced with the chopstick shadow being too strong so I applied very thinned enamel over the fork shadow to balance.

I find this version more interesting with greater variety and in particular the chopstick rest feels very sharp.   Interestingly whilst the sharpness reflects the physical cultural symbol it also suggests the asian culture is menacing or difficult to handle which is not really what I intended but can be true for some things.   I felt I over did the gesso creating confusing marks in some places once it had dried.   I feel I could swallow up lots of time trying out different ways to balance out the parts I don’t like and I’m not sure its worth me progressing further at this stage so I decided to stop.

 

 

 

 

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Reflection on Assignment 3

I found a greater sense of awareness of the marks I was making and how they relate to the subject.   In particular drawing and painting my portrait blind helped me start to rethink my mark making and how the movement and pressure relates to my sense of touch.   For example feeling the shape and hardness around the eye compared to the eye lashes leads came out as putting pressure with a sharp movement around the eye socket and delicate lighter brushed marks around the eye.   These differences can be more pronounced than when I look at them because I’m so used to drawing what I see.

Exploring different paper surfaces enabled me to show more contrast with more paint absorbed into the paper versus less absorbed leading to blurring and a spongy effect.   This led me to select the paper knowing I needed a darker saturated look or one with blurring together with sharper marks.   I would have liked to have tried more variety of surfaces in printing had there been more time to source and try out.   The choice of paper coupled with more or less solvent has enabled me to produce sharp brushed marks compared to softer blurred marks.

Removing paint was a big part of making the marks and creating definition.  Oil is relatively easy to remove from or move on glass and finding appropriate tools to use during the exercises really helped.   Using tissue to remove the feeding baby profile proved to be effective at absorbing the paint and creating a unique profile.

The size A5 of the print is small but surprisingly I didn’t feel the need to go bigger in order to focus on the technique.  I think this encouraged me to be more efficient with marks.

Theres a sense of wanting to create something which is not your normal portrait especially when seeing work from artists like Yuko Nasu (Nasu, s.d) and having read Emily Balls book about portrait painting.  However developing this into something which works in printing and compared to doing something more obvious visually is difficult and must take time.   I do feel I was able to apply relevant marks and emphasis in each print to achieve some of the strengths I set out at the beginning.  For example the emphasis on the mouth with a pull effect helped reinforce the talking moment.

Displaying the prints with space in-between improves the ability to take in the each portrait better than if they were displayed without space in-between.

Its interesting that this time I found ink to be less useful compared to charcoal or acrylic and use of fingers when creating the portraits.   This maybe a result of the blind exercises opening up new possibilities and a greater awareness of my face.   This is pushing me to look for and try things to achieve different emphases such as sharper bony parts of my face and how tight the skin feels.   Obviously using touch is something new and I’d like to explore this further.   I see it as a form of direct observation but I need to relearn how to interpret into marks.

There has been an element of creativity out of drawing and redrawing my portrait through the drawing from photos to adding what I find through touch to painting and removing paint on glass, each time I’m slightly altering the image.   This reminding me of the exercises from Emily Ball’s book and how this process can lead to very different results.  This was most evident in the feeding portrait where I couldn’t see the image I was copying.

I realised the potential for using a piece of rug left under the printing paper to create the mouth and surrounding skin by how it appeared and how I felt my mouth in such a position.  I also liked that the print would be less predictable in terms of how the marks would mix.

Spending time to look at artists such as Annie Kevans (Kevans, 2006) helped me to focus efforts on simplifying portraits down with minimal marks.   It opens me up to trying things I like in different contexts even though it looks like it might not work such as using Kim Baker’s approach to painting large bright marks on dark backgrounds.   I often find I think too much and that when I try to paint more it leads to more insight.   Kevans portrait composition also influenced me to keep a similar head and shoulder frame.   Also the way she displayed the work compared to other artists helped me see how to give the viewer more space to see each portrait  and as a series.

Emily balls book (Ball, 2014) influence on mark making and trying to look at my face differently from touch and seeing different angles.

References

Baker, Kim. (2017) Floral Landscape. At: http://www.kimbaker.co.uk/portfolio.php Accessed on:24/8/17

Ball, Emily (2014) Drawing and Painting People. Marlborough: The Crowood Press Ltd.

Kevans, Annie. (2006) Shakira. At: http://www.anniekevans.com/girls?lightbox=dataItem-ijyuviy3 Accessed on:24/8/17

Saatchi Art. (s.d) 0108 Painting by Yuko Nasu.At:https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-0108/25573/1676080/view  Accessed on:24/8/17

Assignment 3 Monoprints

What is going to be the theme for the 3 monoprints?  Fitting into a culture was the theme from the previous assignment.   I could explore a continuation, expressing the differences in cultures or how I changed from arriving to current life and any changes.

Alternatively ‘being a father’.  Explore from my sons perspective by using photos of me taken by him.   I selected 3 photos, feeding his baby sister, playing with him, telling him to do something.   Interestingly these were not staged but more natural and I’m therefore seeing these as reflection of me being a father.

A similar theme could look at painting his sister from his photos.  Again I was liking the charcoal and finger painted approaches but not ink.    This is as much about the act of painting as it is the end result and the ink seems less physical.

 

I felt I’d benefit more from studying self portraits than that of my daughters mostly for practical reasons of getting enough time to practice.  I like the idea of using photos taken by my son to show his perspective of me being a father.

Feeding the baby

Looking to show closeness, comforting, quiet, warm and soft.  I’m thinking more muted colours, touch with the babies hand playing with my hair, soft light with no strong contrasts, relaxed, eyes closed.

 

My exploration involved looking at making the paint glow like Kim Baker (Baker, 2017) with layered, bright large brush marks showing the form on a dark background.    I liked the large sweeping brush marks and the way they simplified the form taking away any unnecessary marks I often make.   However the bright marks on dark is too intense for this subject.  I could try adding another layer or starting another with different strokes to get a different look but felt either was unlikely to be successful.

The red/pink painting created a more gentle feel but the brushwork is not clear, getting messy suggesting simpler would be bettter.

The blue brushed painting on aluminium felt like how I was intending except the cool colour didn’t feel appropriate.  Here the eyes draw the most attention and help show this more about comforting.

Including the babies hand was more a personal touch which relates to an intimate moment and associated feeling.  Whilst this is not necessarily relevant to my sons perspective it is something that did happen often in such moments and added subtle meaning.   On balance this may have come out too strongly in some prints.

The angle of the head in the photo suggested I should make the profile a feature of the print and start by removing the highlights with various things which I explored in the exercises.   Tissue for the face profile, old rug for the clothes and paint stick for hair.   Wiping away the profile proved hard to follow the underlying drawing and was always going to be less accurate and different each time.  In the first print I found a strange circle on the head caused by some material getting stuck under the paper whilst printing (I liked the effect and noted it to reuse later)

The prints on rice paper (which was very absorbent) looked asian which maybe because of the simplified eyes and light paint.   I kept the paint thinned to create a more subtle portrait in the same way little ink is used on Chinese paintings background.  Interestingly the ear looks like a tiny hand playing with hair and this led me to use the combination intentionally in some of the other prints.

Once I had prints of the other two portraits I started to see the choice of colour needed to fit in more ( a shade too red) when seen as a series.  Also looks like I’m concentrating on the phone.

Playing

Looking to show humour, playful and noisy.

I started with a painting on aluminium that had more likeness. This is probably the most likeness I’ve achieved but it felt too serious to be about playing.   The simplified paintings using Annie Kevans approach didn’t look like me and also didn’t feel fun.   I then changed to using my fingers and using primary colours.  This felt more playful both to do and the result.  Adding a hand to hide behind was also interesting and made me focus on the eye peeking through.   I found painting with my fingers and palm created greater connection with my face and the painting.   I’m finding the ink paintings tend to end up with me painting edges or lines in a way I’ve always done and unless I exaggerate something it lacks expression or feeling.    Charcoal sticks offered something in between where I could use my finger to smudge the marks.

For the print I wanted to capture a likeness following Annie Kevans (Kevans, 2016) simplified approach where the eyes and mouth stand out the most.   I like the composition with the portrait almost coming out of the paper, the direction of the brush strokes and lines of the clothes makes a flow along and around the length of the head.   Its clean.   The print made using kids paint and my finger lacked any interesting features or definition.   Using oils I used rubber gloves to paint with my finger which came out similar to the original paintings I’d done.    Whilst there is a personal element to using your finger the   Per

The final print held greater definition around the features like eyes and smile lines.  There is a more playful expression but the extra focus makes me look older.   Eyes take focus and the clothes looked better with less uniform creases and varying colour.  The darker marks on the neck helped define and bring out the face.

Talking

Looking to show full mouthed, expressive, defined features and high contrast, bold, authoritative, loud.   Mouth to standout (red on blue), looking down slightly.

An earlier exercise using charcoal dust led me to try using my palm to quickly make the first layer of paint before using my finger to paint key features.   This I felt created a strong image of someone making a point.

I used a small ball of material under the print paper (like the mistake in the feeding baby print) to intentionally capture my open mouth telling my son to do something.  The mouth now becomes the focus.   This also led to me smudging the lower part of my face. Whilst this didn’t look like me I found the gaze intense and direct and along the right lines.  I didn’t paint the glasses thinking I could paint them on after.

The vertical straight background print felt too calm and quiet besides being too faint.  I used paper which was not absorbent enough.  I painted this in 3 layered prints and the first had faint marks which didn’t contribute to the portrait making it feel less clean.

The next print felt louder and cleaner and as if about to say something.   I think the direction in the marks in the background help show something is radiating out.   The lips felt over the top and inappropriate for the portrait like I’d kissed it with the paint.  These 2 portraits were made by doing 3 prints on the same paper, layering different elements such as background colour, more detail, key facial features.   This worked ok and enables you to create dark strokes over light keeping them much cleaner that if painted in one layer.

I tried to layer a distorted portrait with large coloured strokes like Kim Baker’s flowers however it came out dull.   The marks not really helping to create form or expression.   I think the layering thinned brush work over any other paint would come out dull and not suited for printing in this way.

The distorted swirling print influenced by Yuko Nasu (Saatchi Art, s.d) looked asleep.  I do like the swirling patterns and perhaps could use to form a portrait.

The distorted face with a receding eye reminded me of a cloud blowing.   The framing of the face so close would not fit with the other portraits so I quickly discounted it.

Changing the background to a salmon colour helped make the cooler face project forwards.  Using the heavy weighted printing paper enabled the extra solvent mixed paint to bleed more especially around the mouth where I was hoping to achieve a pulled effect with something under the print paper.  This didn’t work as effective as the first time but I did get some interesting bleeding and blurring of the colours.   This contrasts well with the straight lined clothes and overall feels like I’m talking in a serious manor.

Final 3 prints

First a look at how artists have displayed their series of portraits.

Annie Kevan’s portraits (Rosen, 2017) show famous people (mostly historical) together as a collection with instant likeness.  The consistent emphasis on key features, hair and clothes with simplified strokes and colour provide a visual consistency that make who is in the collection stand out.  They are positioned equally with space between so that you can view each individually and that the collection is also important.

Yuko Nasu’s (Nasu, s.d) portraits are mixed with different emphasis, colours and level of distortion.  They are positioned very close, almost touching with just a small gap.  Its a bit like lots of people in a room with those crazy curved mirrors where everyone gets some part of their face blown up or shrunk.

Luc Tuyman (this is tomorrow, 2015) takes a more extreme approach compared to the others by displaying them on a brightly light white wall with huge amounts of space around each painting.    They have visual consistency of colour and style and subject and are small relative to the wall.    It seems the subject is on the depressing side and the space allows the viewer to feel and explore this better without being distracted by the next.

Chantel Joffe (Cheim & Read, s.d) gives each of her portraits (of various sizes) space, often a whole wall.

I think my prints are to be viewed as individual moments of being a father which is basically happy.  There should be sufficient space to feel each separately and relate to the next.   When comparing having no space between each and then with space I find no space is too much to take in, too overwhelming.   Giving each print space feels more relaxed enabling you to view each one whilst seeing them as a series in a similar way to Annie Kevan’s display (Rosen, 2017).   I find the talking print needs to lead from the left because it shouts the most and I felt its best to look from left to right.   Vertically is harder to view them although it reminds me of the photo print strips you get from the passport photo booths.  Vertical arrangement may have been more appropriate if my son was included and you get some surprise photos.

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Most successful print is the ‘talking’ print because it captures the expression and sense of saying something.   This print also has the most variety of marks such as the blurred mouth arising from the print lifting around a piece of rug placed over the mouth. Contrasted against straight sharp almost formal clothes.  The bold simple dabbed eyes and the neatly brushed hair.  The others have interesting marks and simple bold eyes but the marks are perhaps too conservative.   I wanted the playing portrait to appear louder more fun than the others or at least the feeding portrait and I feel this is not so obvious. The feeding portrait needed to be softer.

To develop this work I would like to look again at making the playing print more fun or humorous.   Look again at using some of the finger painting but applying in multiple printed layers with some brushed work, use of other body parts?    For the feeding portrait I could try a lighter background to reduce the profile contrast, then more exaggerated features in subsequent layer but lighter on the hair.   Having seen Luc Tuymans The Shore (this is tomorrow, 2015) I could try zooming in on key features of each moment such as eyes or mouth.   I did consider this but thought this would reduce the consistency in the series and often its more than the eye or mouth which is defining the moment.   Obviously I could look to extend this series by looking at other moments such as being tired.

References

Baker, Kim. (2017) Floral Landscape. At: http://www.kimbaker.co.uk/portfolio.php Accessed on:24/8/17

Cheim & Read. (s.d) Chantal Joffe. At:http://www.cheimread.com/exhibitions/chantal-joffe/gallery/installation-images Accessed on:12/9/17

Kevans, Annie. (2006) Shakira. At: http://www.anniekevans.com/girls?lightbox=dataItem-ijyuviy3  Accessed on:24/8/17

Nasu, Yuko. (s.d) Hayley Lock None of Beauties Daughters Yuko Nasu & Liv Pennington. At:http://yukonasu.com/works/2010/coexist/coexist2010.htm Accessed on:12/9/17

Rosen, Miss. (2017) Artist Annie Kevans sets the historical record straight. At:http://www.craveonline.com/art/1189199-artist-annie-kevans-sets-historical-record-straight Accessed on:12/9/17

Saatchi Art. (s.d) 0108 Painting by Yuko Nasu. At:https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-0108/25573/1676080/view  Accessed on:24/8/17

this is tomorrow. (2015) Luc Tuymans: The Shore At:http://thisistomorrow.info/articles/luc-tuymans-the-shore Accessed on:12/9/17

 

Reflection (on assignment 2)

Making my brushwork more evident seems to be important to me through this and the previous assignment.  Whilst I spent most of my time practicing with enamels on aluminium I ended up hardly using them in the final painting, partly because it did not show brushwork strongly.    It was the research into Claire Woods which brought me back to showing brushwork and working with oils instead.    I was hoping enamels would have an element of chance where the paint would still move and mix but this did not have sufficient impact.    Maybe I could have continued with enamels following a more natural style similar to those in my earlier research and used work by Geraldine Swayne as an influence.

I spent time sketching to see the overall composition and the form of the key elements. I’m not convinced the sketching helped me arrive at an effective composition however I do think it helped me see the form and structure of the utensils.    The composition immediately draws you into the spoon then the background takes you around in a clockwise motion.  Out of the tools I used to sketch (charcoal, pen, pencil, ink)  ink and brush  helped me quickly capture and get a feel for the composition.

I feel more confident now with aluminium and I like its’ qualities such as light reflection and ease of applying or removing paint.   There is a feeling of greater potential with more to learn and I’m excited about using aluminium again.

The background shadows appear as strong as the objects casting them which adds an unintended conflict.  The painting of the spoon and chopsticks was slightly too controlled.   I think the way I painted the background is starting to reflect my personal voice because it captured a sense of energy and it felt good whilst painting.   Part of the difficulty has been with me focussing more on the technical and visual aspects throughout the work rather than on a message.    Whilst I have thought about a message (fitting into a different culture) represented by the choice and expression of utensils I’ve often used intuition or a feeling of what to paint and how. Having read Contemporary Drawing by M Davidson about intent I realise there is a lot to consider and that there is a lot going on when I paint and much of this is unconscious or perhaps slightly hidden from me.   Looking at this intent maybe useful moving forward both for researching artists and also my own work.

I have experimented with different content (fork spoon and chopstick) and arrangements to understand more about what I wanted to show.    Experimentation also included materials and I particularly liked the effect of ink and enamel on aluminium and how transparent gesso changed the aluminium to something more like canvas which is more absorbent.  I would have liked to have used some of this experimentation such as the gesso but following some small tests I felt each was taking away rather than adding to the painting.  This gave me a feeling I was stumbling a bit with what to do next.

Clare Woods approach with progressively thinner, more controlled painted marks appealed and formed my approach.   Whilst painting the background I felt the need to form a spiral to draw focus on the spoon and this fitting naturally with the shadow shapes.   I remember seeing this work well in many of Turners paintings of storms.   Another influence has been in the time aspect where I’ve broken the flow of thoughts and painting from the initial experimentation to the final painting and preparation by 10 months.  This may partly explain the change in direction as well as the later research into Clare Woods and Geraldine Swayne.

References

M Davidson (2011) Contemporary Drawing: Key concepts and techniques.

 

Assignment 2 Painting

My exploration of subject, media and techniques lead me to ideas which I wanted to try to use in the final painting.  The key ones being a contrasting view of a fork and spoon with chopsticks expressed using oil on aluminium.   Ideas about how they could relate to me personally were about fitting into a new culture.

 

 

Applying everything so far on a larger scale was both exciting and overwhelming.   I choose A1 size mainly because that was about the size of the aluminium sheet pre-cut and because I wanted to paint something big.

 

 

My intention was to show more of the brush work in a similar approach to Claire Woods and use oil paints.    I used a large household brush for the background and a brush one third the size for the utensils.  Oil mixed with solvent and refined linseed oil was used to reduce the consistency and make it slightly transparent.   This allowed me to be more gestural and less precise with sweeping brush work across the surface which I really enjoyed and would like to do more.    The fork highlights were wiped off whilst wet.   The result was striking and intense and after completing another smaller test I decided to leave it. Originally my intention was to apply a transparent gesso to blur the background further and make the utensils stand out but this combination didn’t seem as appropriate as when enamel had been the ground.    This was because I didn’t want to loose the brushwork which I felt took a step to expressing the culture and also I was expecting to create a relationship with smaller brushwork on the spoon.

At this point I’m wondering what I’m really trying to communicate and whether simply showing the fork/spoon next to chopsticks as I see them in the photos is meaningful.    I knew I didn’t have a strong message and was relying more on a natural expression of form and shadow to represent my intent.

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Leftside: oil on gesso on enamel, right side oil on gesso on oil, both on aluminium
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oil on gesso on enamel on aluminium

Next I used enamel to paint chopsticks because it was less expressive and more about being able to control the brush in such a long straight line.   Enamels where good for dragging and dripping and so I thought should work in favour.   The relationship with negative space was also important so I left highlights and painted the parts in shadow.    The difference in style with the long straight stands out and makes me question whether it fits in with the painting, perhaps it’s too representational compared to the background?   Is this a reflection of the challenge of fitting in with a culture?

Finally I painted the spoon in oils with the smaller brush and tried to paint only the highlights.   However I needed to paint the darker parts to bring the right tone for the spoon relative to the background.   This was moving away from what I liked about the work from Clare Woods however I was trying to get the reflection of the chopsticks into the spoon as well as the highlights.

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Untitled Oil and enamel on aluminium 32″x26″

Overall it is a striking painting of the utensils with dramatic contrasting tones.  The brushwork helps direct the viewer through the painting.  The negative space relates well for the fork and chopstick holder but to a lesser extent with the chopsticks and spoon.   The straight on view allows you to easily see the shape of the utensils and compare.    The intense big brushwork of the shadows is perhaps more overpowering than the actual objects because they are painted with smaller less dramatic marks.    This view was not consciously intended and again moves away from what I observed in Claire Woods painting.      The intent is less clear in terms of the message I’m trying to communicate.  This is partly because I’ve been less clear on defining up front the idea and more focussed on the techniques and composition most appealing to me.

How to develop this is difficult when I’m not clear on the message however I could have taken my approach further and painted the chopsticks as realistic as possible to enhance the sense they all didn’t fit together.    I could try extending the fork approach to the spoon and chopstick and remove paint for highlights and then evaluate the need to paint any darker tones.   This later approach seems appropriate because it would remove the actual utensils leaving the shadows to take focus.   Alternatively look at the way the utensils are used e.g. chopsticks can be more precise compared to using a fork or spoon.   Also I needed to try harder to find other work and artists who have looked at this subject.

Artists who have influenced my work include Clare Woods with the fluid brushwork in oil.  Turner with his dramatic swirling stormy landscapes.

References

M Davidson (2011) Contemporary Drawing: Key concepts and techniques.

Assignment 2 research

The work from the exercises on utensils were successful and I liked the way the light reflected from the aluminium surface and wanted to focus on this for the assignment.

Collection with knife, fork, spoon and a flipper.

 

 

 

The shadows, reflections and surface were key elements that stood out to capture.   I explored sketches of the composition.  Then I explored the use of enamels on aluminium.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I started with black and white enamels and found the best approach was to paint like watercolour, with thinned down black leaving the metal for highlights.     Blurring the paint at the edges proved to be a challenge partly because the enamels found their own resting point which creates a sharp edge.   Going back over the paint later to blur the edges changes the surface with an undesired result usually.  Need to look at painting white first and then use very thin enamels overtop like have done using acrylic.  The use of ink creates extra depth with the ink reflecting more light and pushing the enamel paint forward.

Detailed reflections on the spoon/flipper draws you into the painting and makes it more realistic compared to the the closeup without background and reflections.   Without these reflections and background details the closeup became more abstract and flatter and more effective at this scale.  This close up of the fork spoon knife uses negative space to draw attention to the form creating a good relationship.   The bare aluminium makes them stand out and adds drama to everyday objects with the spoon taking centre stage.   Without any context in the background or reflections makes it feel flatter more abstract at the same time I’ve tried to make them feel real with simple tonal changes reflecting the light.

Using PVA can help to mask highlights however its not very accurate.  It can be painted over giving interesting surface with a little distortion.

Collection fork, spoon and chopsticks

 

 

 

The idea of curating the collection to contrast chopsticks against fork and spoon like Fred Wilson’s mining the museum could add something interesting and relate to me personally.    Angling the light to create exaggerated shadows added another interesting dimension to show the form and show another perspective.

 

I needed more from other artists so I looked closely at Geraldine Swayne and Clare Woods.   Clare Woods used oils to show the form from a fluid flow of brush marks.   The painting Daytime Despair 2014, oil on aluminium, 150x200cm comprises of 2 paintings of different things in the same style and linked by a continuation in background.   Both focus on something of interest, the left less clear the right the feeding of a bird in a nest.   Both are flat yet 3D with the foreground standing out over the pale background with expressive strokes in oil on aluminium.   Colour is bright, muted and calm.   Foreground is more controlled than the background which seems to be more animated.   The title suggests this is not necessarily calm or content.   My understanding is the left is a pile of receipts which is more mundane work to do and the right is a bird feeding a much larger bird which seems unnatural.   The negative space is used to show the form.   The darker warmer colours used on the bird draw your attention and creates depth over the background.   I found the work by Geraldine interesting but I could not see why her technique would be appropriate for expressing the utensils.

Whereas Geraldine’s small enamel painting on metal (6x10cm) 2017 is about capturing an intense facial expression through contrasting strong tones and colours.   This portrait immediately draws your focus on the eyes and mouth before moving up to the hair and down past the ears.   Theres a mix of strongly painted marks and some less controlled thinly painted marks over the top.   The background has been painting over to give a clean edge and without features so that the portrait takes focus.   The size of all her work is on the small side which really focuses you in on the detail, demanding a closer look.

I’ve had difficulty applying most paint other than enamel to the unprimed aluminium so I’ve purchased some pre-primed aluminium and also some transparent gesso. Oil paint was the the best at showing the brush marks in one stroke and anything on gesso the worst because it became too absorbent.  However the unprimed aluminium still enabled me to paint slow purposeful brush strokes to create form which also created a relationship with the negative space.

The closeups of just the fork created interesting shapes but I felt it was becoming less a collection of items.   This could work if I’d focus on the reflection of the collection in the fork surface.

Looking at the collections with many chopsticks led me to focus on the shadows which created interesting shapes.  The use of gloss on the shadows adds too much reflection to the painting.   Placing the spoon from another photo on top like in an earlier exercise did not stand out because it was too dark relative to the background which also has a lot going on.   The background could be more about the shadows which can represent the chopsticks without painting the chopstick, this would allow the spoon to be painted over.

 

 

 

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Moving forward, Claire Woods approach feels to be an appropriate response to apply because it encourages me to not be so realistic and focus on the form and composition and use of negative space.   I would need to look at the use of brush sizes to ensure the scale is appropriate.

 

 

 

 

Artists from feedback

Velasquez

Les Meninas 1656 oil on canvas 318 x276cm.

A grand group portrait of a scene centered on an infant.   The size must mean its close to life size.   The light from the window highlights the infant and her ladies in waiting and draws attention along with the sharpness of brushwork on the infant compared to those figures in the periphery and dark vast room.   The grand scale of the work and the room compared to the figures adds to the grandness.   The flowery parts of the dresses are painted with movement and have clearer edges drawing attention over the other parts which are blended loosing much of the brushwork.

Turner

Rain, Steam, and Speed – The Great Western Railway 1844 91 x 121.8 cm oil on canvas

The eye is immediately drawn to the funnel on the train moving towards the viewer.   The rest of the painting is almost completely blurred with very faint hints of people and animals.   The blurriness of the train compared to the funnel creates movement.  There are areas of impasto heavy near white paint over-layered with washes of colour.   It seems he paints the white paint thickly early with a knife then adds washes of colour over from light to dark for the sky.   Then dark to light for the train.

Snow Storm – Steam-Boat off a Harbour’s Mouth 1842 91x 122cm oil on canvas.

The boat is completely engulfed by the storm.   The sweeping wide brush work gives the waves the movement and strength over the small boat which is being tossed around.  The smoke is warmer and darker than the sky and spirals out with the flow of the storm.   Similar use of thick white for the light with coloured washes over-layered.

Sketchbooks of turner show he mostly captured the key features with outlines.  Sometimes he would include some shading lines to indicate shadow.    Some of the marine sketches of boats use ink and were probably made far quicker(a) (Top Left) Composition Study for 'Walton Bridges'; (b) (Top Right) Composition on the Theme of Walton Bridge; (c) ?Maidenhead Bridge 1805 by Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851

A Sinking Ship and a Boat in Rough Seas circa 1805 by Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851

 

Peter Doig

Man dressed as bat 2007,Oil on linen, 275 x 200 cm.  He kept the rain damage to the painting, allowing rain to affect it then using the marks to influence his marks.   Painted very thin washes, can almost see through the image.